Monday, February 07, 2005

Hospital Stays and Recovery

Around the end of January, I slipped on some ice in the parking lot of our apartment complex and subsequently broke my foot and ankle and it required me to have surgery. Needless to say, when I was in the emergency room and heard this news, I was not a happy camper. I am not one who gets squeamish about blood or doctors, but I was not really fond of the idea of having to have surgery.

After being treated in the emergency room, I was then admitted to the hospital and had to play the waiting game as to when they would operate. One of the pastoral staff members and his wife stopped by to have prayer with my wife and I once they found out that I was going to have surgery sometime that evening. Shortly after that, the surgeon came in and gave me the details of what he was going to do and then allowed me to ask questions. I had a few of them, but I was glad that he allowed me the opportunity to know what was going on with my care. I also think that he knew or sensed some nervousness or apprehension on my part. After all, I hadn't been in a hospital as a patient for many years (since I was a kid and had my tonsils out!)

After the doctor answered my questions and those that my wife had, he then took out a pen and proceeded to autograph my left foot. I chuckled at first, but then remembered the horror stories of people who went into the hospital for one thing and had something else done.

The surgery was a success and I was able to come home from the hospital on Monday 1/31.

I am very thankful for a lot of things that happen while you are in the hospital. They always check and recheck your ID bracelet to make sure that they are giving the right medication to the right patient. They are very particular about when they take your vital signs and they record everything. The nurses on my floor were especially kind and very efficient with their care.

A lot of people have heard their share of horror stories and bad experiences with hospital stays. I am thankful that mine was a positive one, in spite of the circumstances. As I was in the hospital bed and the nurses were in and out of the room periodically, I thought what it would be like if I had to take care of a number of people in various situations, probably not an easy job. I determined that even though I wasn't feeling the best and things were not 100% okay, I wanted to be a testimony for the Lord Jesus Christ, by being as kind and as nice as possible. Nurses and other healthcare professionals often work 10-12 hours shifts, sometimes longer and they probably are on the receiving end of a lot of criticism and complaining from patients.

Everyone also has their stories and comments about hospital food. I thought that the food was okay. It wasn't bad, and it wasn't great either. It met a need, I was hungry and they brought me breakfast, lunch, and dinner. I even got to choose my meals. The nice part about this was just before my accident, I was working out about 30 mins a day in an effort to lose some weight. I wanted to lose 10 lbs by the end of February. I was really serious about working out and was really trying to watch how much and what I ate. Well, in the hospital, there are no seconds, and the portions are small and no in-between meal snacks. This has really helped me because I have noticed a difference in how much and what I eat, now that I am home. It doesn't help that I cannot exercise, but I am able to at least control what I am eating and not devour everything that I see.

I am now at home recovering, trying to also complete some of my seminary coursework until I am cleared to return to work and seminary classes. Please pray for a speedy and thorough recovery. I return to the Dr. for a follow up on 2/16/05.

Hospitals aren't so bad after all.

-Terry

1 Comments:

Blogger Cindy said...

Glad you're doing better, Terry!

Tuesday, February 08, 2005 12:20:00 PM  

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